Secrets to making a true Neapolitan Pizza like a Master Pizzaiolo

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Neapolitan Pizza
Handmade Neapolitan Pizza – by yours truly!

I recently took a really fun and cool pizza making class to learn the secrets of making a true Neapolitan Pizza (Vera Napoletana) with the Food Bloggers NYC Meetup Group sponsored by Vimbly.com.

Culinary Bad Boy & Nicole Garguilo
Culinary Bad Boy & Nicole Garguilo

The class was held at 180 Neapolitan Eatery in Little Italy and taught by Culinary Event host Nicole Garguilo and Food Network Star “Culinary Bad Boy” Chef Chris Nirschel.

Class having a blast making dough
Class having a blast making dough
NYC Food Bloggers Meetup Group
NYC Food Bloggers Meetup Group

We sat around a big table in a private room upstairs and learned the techniques, traditions and passions behind producing a perfectly thin crispy Neapolitan pizza while sipping on Italian wines and making new friends.

Making Pizza Dough
Making Pizza Dough

We learned the intricacies behind making and kneading our own dough accustom to the Neapolitan style by making wells of flour filled with yeast water and the patient process of kneading using only 2 fingers as the dough slowly came together by kneading, mixing and adding more flour and water.

Chef Chris throwing dough
Chef Chris throwing dough

We watched Chef Chris toss pizza dough in the air and even tried it ourselves (too fun!).

Chef Chris demonstrating how to sauce the pizza
Chef Chris demonstrating how to sauce the pizza

We then made our own Margherita sauce made with San Marzano tomatoes from Italy, and topped off the pizzas with cubes of fresh cow’s milk Mozzarella and fresh basil before our pizzas were thrown delicately into a 900 degree oven on a pizza peel to reveal a perfectly crispy gorgeous pizza of bubbly cheesy goodness.

Prepping our Pizzas
Prepping our Pizzas

Layer the dough with sauce…

San Marzano Tomato Sauce, Fresh Mozzarella & Basil
San Marzano Tomato Sauce, Fresh Mozzarella & Basil

Add some delicious Fresh Cow’s Milk Mozzarella and Basil…

Good Times constructing our pizzas
Good Times constructing our pizzas

Patiently waiting for the oven…

Pizzas ready for the Wood-fired oven
Pizzas ready for the Wood-fired oven
Look. At. This. Masterpiece. Creation.
Look. At. This. Masterpiece. Creation.

And let the deliciousness devouring begin.

Good Times
Good Times

The story behind Neapolitan pizza goes like this: In June 1889, a Neapolitan tavern owner Raffaele Esposito served the Queen of Italy, Margherita of Savoy, a special dish named in her honor. The wood-fired Flatbread was topped with Melted Mozzarella, Tomato Sauce and Basil leaves, symbolizing the colors of the Italian Flag. The Queen was so pleased with her meal that she had a wood-fired “flat-bread oven” built into the palace. And history was made.

Pizzaiolo at 180
Pizzaiolo at 180

The art behind making a perfect, true Neapolitan pizza has become a standard practice with strict rules of approval. The Associazione Verace Pizza Napoletana is a non-profit official governing association in Italy that maintains the standards and regulations of all Pizzaioli and Establshments serving Vera Napoletana Pizza. It was founded in Naples in 1984 by the oldest and well-known Neapolitan pizzaioli, and according to the “rules” proposed by them, there are specific ingredients and techniques that must be used to pass the official Italian seal of approval.

The Perfect Neapolitan Pizza
The Perfect Neapolitan Pizza

So just what are the secrets behind making that crispy crust with gooey cheese and succulent sauce? Here’s a few secrets from Restaurateur/Chef and native New Yorker, Nick Accardi of Tavola in Hell’s Kitchen:

  1. Measure by weight rather than volume to get the perfect water to flour ratio for your crust. Many elements can change the density of ingredients such as age, storage temperature, or environmental climate. Measuring by weight assures the perfect hydration ratio.
  2. Use double zero (type 00) flour which is a highly refined flour that has been milled to a standard “00” and completely free of bran or germ.
  3. Use natural Neapolitan yeast or brewer’s yeast, sea salt and water. (New York City tap water is the BEST secret ingredient in making the perfect pizza dough!)
  4. Keep yeast refrigerated and check the expiration date on the package to make sure it’s fresh.
  5. The dough must be kneaded by hand or with a low-speed mixer.
  6. Allow the dough to rise for 24 hours at room temperature. The bare minimum standard is 6 hours (after mixing let the dough rise for 2 hours, then hand cut and roll into small balls, let rise for 4 more hours).
  7. After the rising process, the dough must be formed by hand without the help of a rolling pin or other machine, and may be no more than 3 millimeters (0.12 in) thick. Use your hands to gently work the dough from the center outward.
  8. Use San Marzano tomatoes, which grow on the volcanic plains to the south of Mount Vesuvius, for the pizza sauce like a bona fide pro (easy to find in grocery stores or Italian markets).
  9. Vera Napoletana Pizza must be made using only fresh, all-natural, non-processed ingredients including Fior di Latte (Cow’s Milk) or Bufala Mozzarella, fresh basil and drizzled with real Extra Virgin Olive Oil. You can find Genuine imported EVOO also at Italian markets such as Eataly or Tavola in NYC.
  10. Less is More: Don’t drown a pizza in sauce and toppings. The most delicious pies use smaller portions of the highest quality of fresh ingredients.
  11. A thin crust is the signature trait of Neapolitan pizza. While having a wood fired oven at home is not common these days, making your crust as thin as possible will allow for fast cooking time, which intensifies and seals in the flavors of each ingredient. Note: The Associazione Vera Pizza Napoletana requires the thickness of the crust to be 1-2 cm.
  12. The pizza must be baked for 60-90 seconds in a 905°F stone oven with an oak-wood fire. When cooked, it should be crispy, tender and fragrant.
  13. There are three official variants to Neapolitan pizza: Pizza Marinara, which is made with tomato, garlic, oregano and extra virgin olive oil, Pizza Margherita, made with tomato, sliced mozzarella, basil and extra-virgin olive oil, and Pizza Margherita Extra made with tomato, mozzarella from Campania in fillets, basil and extra virgin olive oil.
Neapolitan Pizza being devoured
Neapolitan Pizza being devoured

Neapolitan Pizza (Vera Napoletana) Recipe

Prep Time: 6 hours

Cook Time: 7 minutes

Total Time: 6 hours, 7 minutes

Yield: 2-4

A great home kitchen version of authentic Neapolitan pizza

Ingredients

  • For the dough:
  • 1/4 teaspoon active dry yeast
  • 1 1/4 cups warm water 100-110 degrees
  • 17 ounces (4 cups) unbleached “00” flour (see note) or unbleached all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons fine sea salt
  • 1-2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil (for greasing bowl)
  • For the topping:
  • 1 (28-ounce) can whole San Marzano tomatoes, passed with juices through a food mill
  • 12 ounces Mozzarella di Bufala (see note) or mozzarella fior di latte cheese, cut into 1/4-inch-thick slices
  • 4 large or 8 small basil leaves
  • Extra virgin olive oil
  • Medium coarse sea salt
  • Special equipment: a pizza stone and peel

Instructions

  1. Make the dough: Sprinkle yeast over water; let stand until yeast is creamy, 5 to 10 minutes. (If yeast does not become creamy, discard and start over with new yeast.)
  2. In a large bowl, whisk together flour and salt; form a well in center. Add yeast mixture and warm water; stir until dough just comes together. Turn out dough onto a lightly floured work surface and knead vigorously, for 10 minutes. Cover with a damp dish towel and let rest for 10 minutes, then knead vigorously for 10 minutes more. Lightly oil a large bowl. Form dough into a ball, transfer to bowl and turn to lightly coat with oil. Cover bowl tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight.
  3. Punch down dough with your fist (dough will be stiff), then fold sides over one another, turn dough, tightly cover bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate at least 4 hours or up to 24 hours.
  4. Divide dough into 4 pieces; shape pieces into balls and place on a lightly floured work surface, leaving a few inches between balls. Loosely cover with a damp dish towel (not terry cloth) and let rise at warm room temperature until doubled, about 2 hours; time may vary depending on room temperature and freshness of yeast. If skin forms on dough while rising, lightly spray surface with water.
  5. Heat Stone While Dough Rises: Position rack in lower third of oven. Place pizza stone on rack. At least 45 minutes before baking pizza, heat oven to maximum temperature (500 to 550 degrees).
  6. Assemble Pizza: On a lightly floured work surface, press 1 dough ball with your fingers to begin to shape into a round. Use your fist and hands to gently stretch dough to a 10-inch round. (A floured rolling pin can be used to help roll out dough.) Transfer dough to a lightly floured peel; gently shake peel to make sure dough does not stick.
  7. Working fairly quickly, spread a 1/3 cup sauce over dough, leaving about a 1/2 -inch border. Tear 3 ounces cheese into pieces and arrange on top of sauce. Tear 1 or 2 basil leaves into small pieces and arrange on top. Drizzle very lightly with oil and sprinkle with salt. Slide pizza onto stone. Bake until cheese is melted and bubbling in spots and edge of dough is crisp and golden, about 7 minutes. Using the peel and a large spatula or pair of tongs, transfer pizza to a plate and serve. Repeat with remaining ingredients.

Notes

Note: Soft “00” flour produces a pliable, easy-to-work-with pizza dough and a tender yet sturdy crust with a crisp yet not too dry edge. Mozzarella fior di latte has a firmer texture than Mozzarella di Bufala, which falls apart when cut, though both cheeses are creamy when melted. You can find “00” flour, San Marzano tomatoes, mozzarella di bufala, mozzarella fior di latte at Italian markets, specialty stores, and online.

Recipe by La Cucina Italiana Magazine

http://www.theartfulgourmet.com/2013/08/11/neapolitan-pizza-making-with-the-pros/

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• Check out more cool fun food events on Vimbly and the NYC Food Blogger’s group on Meetup.com

• Italian Resources and Specialty Products:

Associazione Verace Pizza Napoletana: http://www.pizzanapoletana.org

Tavola’s Hell’s Kitchen: www.tavolashellskitchen.com

Teitel Brother’s: http://www.teitelbros.com

Eataly NYC: http://www.eataly.com

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8 Replies to “Secrets to making a true Neapolitan Pizza like a Master Pizzaiolo”

  1. Great article. The pizza making class sounds so fun. You said measure everything by weight but then didn’t list the weight for the flour in the recipe. How much does your 4 cups of flour weigh?

  2. When a recipe calls for room temperature, whats the ideal temperature? It seems like such a vague term that depends on where you live. Our room temperature is around the 80’s Fahrenheit here in Puerto Rico. Would it be better to let the dough rise in an air conditioned room or in the fridge?

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